Dana Drosdick

Dana Drosdick
Sophomore
Digital Communications and Spanish
Ballston Spa, New York

3. Oviedo: Food To Try

Fabada, special only to Oviedo

Fabada, special only to Oviedo

Just like how Kentucky is famous for their fried chicken and Louisiana is famous for its gumbo, Oviedo has its unique set of food.  To my delight, my host parents here have been very intentional in giving me a gastronomic tour of all the food special to Oviedo. The food here has been delectable, and my host father knows how to cook like no one else. I’ve been blessed with homemade empadillas (similar to empanadas, but with tomato and egg inside), fried veal, loads of chorizo and other amazing concoctions. 

Just last week he made Fabada for me, a dish specific to Oviedo. It’s a bean stew with different meats inside—very thick and rich. At the end of every meal my host father asks, “Te gusta?” (you like it?), to which I always respond, “Sí sí, mucho!” (I’m sure you can figure that one out).

Sidra poured by an expert

Sidra poured by an expert

Besides Fabada, the other local delicacy is called Sidra. Sidra is an alcoholic cider made from apples and typically served with chorizo in a bun. However, you don't just get sidra for the flavor; you get it for the experience. The bartender holds the bottle up as high as he can, every time, and tips it into the glass on the counter, looking dead ahead rather than at the glass or the bottle. Although it was incredibly impressive, I am very curious to know how much practice it takes and also how much Sidra is wasted in the process.

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Although not local to Oviedo, when in Spain you always need to try churros y chocolate and café con leche. Churros y chocolate is essentially a thicker, richer hot chocolate (basically molten chocolate) with fried churros sprinkled in sugar and cinnamon.   The chocolate was sinfully delicious. I may or may not have gotten a stomachache afterwards (worth it nonetheless). Café con leche is simply coffee with milk. However, coffee in Spain, (and Europe in general) is much richer and better made than in the United States. Plus, it’s a lot cheaper, so it can satisfy your coffee addiction and your wallet.